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Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings
Onyá•le ko Earrings

Onyá•le ko Earrings

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$37.00
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These earrings are designed by Kaluyahawi in collaboration with the Pacha Arts Family. 

We spent many weeks talking about a design that would connect to both our cultures: Oneida and Kichwa. Snakes in particular came up as a misunderstood being with stories that are important to remember. In Andean cosmology, snakes can be a symbol of the cyclical nature of time. 

One side of the earring design represents the Oneida side and the other is the Kichwa side. In this way they connect Northern and Southern Indigenous communities in meaningful ways. Being true to each of our teachings while sharing stories with each other.


Onyá•le ko (the great snake)

Written by Kaluyahawi:

“The story I remember about the great snake is about a little boy who trapped a black snake with rainbow iridescence in a bucket. He kept the snake as a pet and fed it. The snake grew and grew until it couldn’t fit in its buckets anymore. The boy took that snake to a cave and told it to live there. He said he’ll continue to feed the snake. the snake grew larger and needed more meat to eat. The boy grew into a young man and learned how to hunt. Most days he didn’t bring enough food back for the snake. The snake was still getting larger after each meal and said “I’ll make this hunting charm for you, so you can bring me lots of food and deer meat.” The young man took the charm and asked if this will help feed his community too. The snake replied yes.

Over time the snake grew and so did the young man, the snake was outgrowing its cave and was constantly hungry. The young man missed a feeding day, he was busy living and taking care of his community and family; he forgot the snake. That same evening the snake left its den and slithered down to the village. It scared and chased the villagers to the cave. The villagers thought the cave was safe, but it was actually the snakes mouth. The villagers unknowingly walked into the snake’s mouth and were eaten.

The young man was out hunting and came back to the village. It was partially destroyed because of the panic from the large snake.  He went looking for those villagers and remembered he forgot to feed the snake. He knew the snake did this so he visited it’s den. The snake lay there in the sun sleeping. The young man walked around quietly and heard muffled somber singing coming from the snakes belly. He snuck up on the snake and cut it open while it slept. The snake died and the singing got louder. This young man could see the people sitting there singing, so he started to remove them from the stomach and they didn’t do anything. They stopped singing and sat there, covered in snake innards and had a strange glow to them. 

The man spoke to these people, but they wouldn’t reply. He tried feeding them and they wouldn’t eat. They sat there, still, crying and glowing. Even after being washed, they still had a glow around them. He didn’t know they had died and needed an okiwe ceremony done. he remembered the songs they sang in its stomach and he sang for them. They got up and walked around him while he sang. When he was done, they all disappeared.“

_______________________________

Kaluyahawi Jocelyn Antone.
My art is always changing, like the clouds in the sky and the stars in our galaxy.
Open minded individual, professional creative living with adhd. Self accomplished digital artist, Oneida turtle clan from Oneida nation of the Thames with familial roots in saddle lake Alberta, I currently reside in Six Nations. Self proclaimed language nerd, learning Kanyen’kéha (Mohawk) and Onyota’a:ka (Oneida) languages to create more language resources and translate into digital storytellings.

Learning more about human connections, communication and community, thriving and
growing, I aspire to become a brand and create a positive impact in community through art. I enjoy mutually sharing cultural teachings and stories with open minded people within different communities, one of my passions is learning about different Indigenous cultures and the similarities between our cultures.

 

Materials: Acrylic mirror, Silver plaited findings

Dimensions:

Width (at it's widest): 1.5 inch

Length (Including Hook): 3.5 inches